The grandparent scam

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“First of all, let me tell you I have caller I.D and I never take unknown calls but that day I was working on something and I picked up the phone and that's how it all started” said Elsie Castille of Breaux Bridge.

It's called the Grandparent Scam and preys on people's emotions. In Elsie's case there was a man on the other line claiming to be a lawyer for her grandson. That lawyer said he was in trouble and needed money wired to him. In a panic for her grandson, Elsie wired almost three thousand dollars to Guatemala. But when she was asked by the same person to wire more money, the lady who works for MoneyGram got suspicious and told her to first call her grandsons mother.

When Elsie did, she found out he was not in any danger and working in Texas. Lucky the second wire never went through and Elsie didn't lose more money to the scam artist. Elsie now realizes there were many red flags that should have stopped her from wiring the money, but Elsie said she did what would any good grandmother would do under that circumstance.

The Better Business Bureau says the Grandparent Scam is on the rise in Acadiana. They do advise people not to act on emotions or disclose any information before confirming that it really is their grandchild.

One easy way to confirm their identity is to ask a simple question that the grandchild would know such as what school he or she goes to or their middle name.

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