AP scores increase in Lafayette

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Between 30 to 40 Lafayette Parish teachers graduated from the Advanced Placement Summer Institute this summer.

Randy Bernard, who oversees Advanced Placement—or AP—training for parish teachers, said these numbers reflect growing enrollment in these classes.

“In 2009, Lafayette Parish offered fewer than ten AP courses in all of its high schools. We have been growing that as quickly as we can. We’re offering over 30 AP courses now,” said Bernard.  

AP courses count for college credit. At the end of an AP course, students take a final exam—with a twist. Instead of A, B, C, D or F; it’s one, two, three, four or five—with five being the best possible score and three as a passing grade.

“We know more kids are earning passing scores on the exams,” said Bernard.

According to Bernard, 98 students received a three or better on an AP final exam in 2011. In 2014, about 300 students received a three or higher on an AP final exam.

“Kids who earn passing scores on AP classes, the research shows, graduate from college on time with far greater frequency than their peers,” said Bernard.

The higher you score on the exam, Bernard said, the more credits hours you may be able to put towards graduation from college. For example, he said, scoring a five in AP English Literature equals nine credits at UL-Lafayette.

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